ShapeUp Outdoors

ShapeUpSHAPEUP!

I love to get out in the Spring after a Winter of exercising indoors. Even if you haven’t done much over the winter, the green smell of plants and flowers in the air and switching on to daylight savings time are great motivators.
Start with a duration you’re comfortable with and work your way up. I do some standing pushups and a couple of stretches at the end of my walk to round out the workout.

 

 

 

ShapeUp Exercises

No equipment necessary, just your favorite tree. Here is what I do:

Standing Pushups: Stand facing your tree and stretch arms in from of you, chest level and place hands on the tree a few inches apart. Keeping your body straight, slowly bend elbows until your chest is close to the tree and push back with a single thrust.

 

Work up to 20 reps. Works chest, and arms.

 

 

 

Back Extention: Stand facing your tree and stretch arms in front of you slightly below chest level.
Place hands on the tree a few inches apart. Keep arms stretched as you bend back lifting your head chin up while contracting your abs. Hold for 10-20 seconds. Stretches back.

Front Thigh Stretch: Stand facing your tree and hold on with your left hand. Grab your right ankle and gently pull heel towards buttocks. Hold for 10-20 seconds. Then switch legs. Stretches the front thigh muscles.

 

 

Shapeup and enjoy the process of getting and staying fit this Spring.

EASE IN, BECOME MOBILE, GET STRONG, LIVE LONG!  

Fabulous Forever Workouts SHOP NOW GET 25% OFF ALL MIRABAI’S PRODUCTS PUT CODE: FABWKOUTS CLICK HERE

FREE SHIPPING

Follow Mirabai Holland: Certified Health Coach & Certified Exercise Physiologist:

 

And for more info visit http://www.mirabaiholland.com

 

Share

Cancer and Exercise

Cancer and ExerciseCancer and Exercise: Best exercises for Cancer Patients?

In my health coaching practice, I consult with women who want to exercise but have health issues that make them uncertain as to how much they should do. Recently I had a client who said, “I am recovering from breast cancer. I finished my chemotherapy a few weeks ago and though I still feel weak, I was wondering if I should start exercising again?” And this is what I told her.

If your doctor says you’re up to it, you can get started. Best Exercises For Cancer Patients: according to ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine)

Cancer and Exercise

The best exercises for cancer patients is a combination of the three major components of fitness: Cardio, Strength and Flexibility. These types of exercise can have a positive impact on cancer patients and survivors. Easy aerobic exercise for cancer patients, has been shown to increase hemoglobin levels, reduce inflammation, lessen fatigue, keep muscles in shape for better every day activities, increase self confidence, reduce depression and aid in recovery of surgery.

Other research has shown strength and flexibility exercises to be good exercises for cancer patients helping them return to a normal activity level sooner.

Exercise and social support seem to increase the life expectancy of breast cancer survivors, preventing recurrence.

At the beginning, gently move a few minutes at a time, and build up at your own pace. Try walking, light aerobics or swimming. As you get stronger, add a couple of days a week of light resistance training. On days you feel more tired, try doing a few stretches.

Personal Note: It has been my privilege and joy to use my skill as a Certified Health Coach & Exercise Physiologist Specialist to help women manage their cancer with the healing properties of movement and exercise. It is from my own experience, that exercising on a regular basis, eating healthy food and reducing your stress can help prevent and/or manage cancer and many other life threatening diseases.

Click on Cancer and Exercise for more info. Visit www.mirabaiholland.com

for in home exercise programs for women over 50.

Bernadine’s Crusade

My mother died in 2005 from Ovarian Cancer. Here is a poem I wrote about her.

Time it was when she found out how sick she was.

Like a Gladiator she got in her wheel chair and with her cane she fought against her illness.

Month after month she strived and relished every peach, every plum.

Moment by moment from lunch to lunch, she road the streets and shopped for food, clothes and jewelry as if she would live forever.

Her doctors were amazed at the way she road into their offices waving her cane
in stylish hats.

For her it was just the way she lived.

Opinionated, visually acute; her sense of aesthetics keen.

Expressive, she once cooed for me like a bird then clicking her teeth like a sparrow eating a tiny meal.

So it went.

Until the last, she raged with her cane beside her in the bed.

Little sips of ice mocha and chocolate malts

Slowing down.

Barely breathing,

her eyes flew open, to take one last peek

getting ready for the next to come.

mwh©

You Tube Multi Device Banner copyTAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH!

Get 20% off of all Mirabai’s Products

EASE IN, BECOME MOBILE, GET STRONG, LIVE LONG!  

PUT FabFall at checkout and get 20% off

For more info on health and wellness programs please visit www.mirabaiholland.com

 Follow Mirabai Holland, Certified Health Coach & Certified Exercise Physiologist:

 

Send your Moving Free® with Mirabai questions to askmirabai@movingfree.com

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Share

Healthy Life!

Healthy LifeHealthy Life!

What do we want for the second half of our lives? Health and mobility are at the top of my list. It boils down to a healthy life!
Keeping all my marbles into my old age is right up there too. Financial security is nice but without those other three, it’s a distant fourth. So how do we do it, maximize our chances of health into our old age?

We all know how. Eat healthy, exercise, get regular checkups, reduce stress. It’s a simple formula. So why is it so hard to do?

You know, I don’t think it’s hard to do, but I do think not doing it is a lot easier. The path of least resistance is paved with delicious processed foods, wines and spirits that hit the spot at the end of a day, lounge chairs that give you a massage and play your favorite tunes, remotes and DVRs that offer sedentary adventure with the push of a button, games that appeal to your inner super hero. It’s a long list and it’s become our way of life. Who wants to eat healthy, exercise, yada yada yada when you’ve got all that?

Well, if you want a healthy life, or maybe a second half at all, I suspect you do.

So, I’d like to offer a method that may take some of the sting out of making the necessary lifestyle changes.

Healthy Life Changes

· Start by adding one good thing. Don’t take away anything just yet. Just add one good healthy thing and try to make it something important enough to keep it going for a lifetime.
Make your own list of good things. But may I suggest starting with exercise as the first good thing. It worked for me and I’ve found getting moving, and eventually fit, helps my clients feel motivated to make all the other changes on their list.

Here’s a short video that will give you the beginner’s fitness formula I use with my clients for a Healthy Life.

Healthy Life Steps

· Ease in to adding that new good thing.
Too much of a good thing tends to be short lived. Pamper yourself a bit. Stay in your comfort zone while moving gently but steadily forward

· Add a second.
Once the first healthy thing is solidly a part of your life, add another. It can be anything good like eating more fruit or stopping for a slow count to 10 and a few deep breaths when you feel stressed.

· Cut one bad.
Once you’ve got two going try cutting out an unhealthy or less healthy thing. See where I’m going here. Gradually add two good, cut out one bad. Substitute old favorite foods for new healthier favorite foods. Add taking a walk; get rid of sitting around watching as much TV.

· Easy does it.
There’s no need to go to extremes. Keeping it up is the key. Little by little you’ll be substituting a healthy lifestyle for a less healthy lifestyle. It’s a constant journey. You’ll never arrive because your destination keeps changing. The more you do the more you’ll want to do. You set a goal and achieving it puts you in sight of a new goal.

· Expect speed bumps
Lifestyle changes are not an exact science and one size does not fit all. You’ll need to experiment and find the methods that work best for you. Attitude is key. If you can stay relaxed enjoy ever little victory and shrug off every little setback, the road should feel smoother.
It may be hard to see your progress except in retrospect. Looking back at where you started after a year, you may marvel at the changes you’ve made. Feel free to congratulate yourself.

*Physical Fitness and All-cause Mortality Blair et Al Jama 11/3/89
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2795824
Mortality trends in the general population: the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness
J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Nov; 24(4_supplement): 27-35.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2951585
Health benefits of physical activity: the evidence: CMAJ. 2006 Mar 14; 174(6): 801-809.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1402378

For more health and fitness information and at home exercise programs please visit www.mirabaiholland.com

EASE IN, BECOME MOBILE, GET STRONG, LIVE LONG!  Healthy Life.

To View All Products: Click Here  Healthy LifeGET 20% OFF ALL MIRABAI HOLLAND DVD PRODUCTS UNTIL OCTOBER 31, 2016.

PUT THIS CODE AT CHECKOUT: TAKECHARGE

Follow Mirabai Holland on 

 

 

Share

Fall Prevention-Keep An Eye On Falls

Fall PreventionIs your vision putting you at risk for a deadly fall? The answer may surprise you. Falls are a leading cause of death in older adults.

Do you really want to go out with that kind of a bang? Not being able to distinguish, or maybe just being less likely to notice a hazard that causes a fall, is a problem that sneaks up on you.

 The quality of our vision diminishes with age slowly, and often goes unnoticed; or we may just rationalize symptoms away.

Starting at around 40 the lenses in our eyes become less elastic making it hard to focus up close. We eventually admit it and fix the problem with reading glasses. But that’s just the beginning. By around 50 we may think there’s not enough light in a room, or daylight conditions are immediately too bright when we go outside. In fact our pupils have gotten smaller, and our ability to adjust to changing light has slowed with age. So we require more light indoors, and transitions from dim to bright conditions become more difficult. We don’t usually think of aging eyesight as the cause. It’s easy to shrug off.

As we get older and contrast perception diminishes, making it harder to perceive stairs, curbs and other dangers, we blame shadows or glare. And worsening vision throws off our balance and proprioception (knowing where our bodies are in space). Combine imperfect vision with age related orthopedic issues and we’re set up for a life altering or life-ending event.

Most of the time, the vision problem is easily corrected with a visit to an ophthalmologist and prescription for glasses. And if you do have a more serious issue, it can be detected and treated before vision loss occurs or gets worse. But remember, it sneaks up on you. So get a checkup even if you don’t think you need one.

You Tube Multi Device Banner copyTAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH!

Get 20% off of all Mirabai’s Products

Put Code: FIT4FALL CLICK HERE

For more info on health and wellness programs please visit www.mirabaiholland.com

Follow Mirabai Holland, Certified Health Coach & Certified Exercise Physiologist:

www.youtube.com/movingfreedvds

www.twitter.com/movingfree

www.facebook.com/movingfree

Send your Moving Free® with Mirabai questions to askmirabai@movingfree.com

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Share

Triglycerides: Skinny On Your Hidden Fat

TriglyceridesTriglycerides Your Hidden Fat:

Triglycerides:  A too-thick waistline, plus high levels of a fat called triglycerides in the blood can greatly increase risk of coronary artery disease. Triglycerides are both produced by the body and ingested through the food you eat.

High triglyceride levels can increase your risk for heart disease and are more common among inactive people with larger waistlines. Normal triglyceride levels are below 150 mg/dL. The risk of developing coronary artery disease doubles when triglyceride levels are above 200 mg/dL.

Triglycerides are called the hidden fat because they are too often overshadowed by the highly publicized LDL bad cholesterol.

However triglycerides are above 200 mg/dL and “good” (HDL) cholesterol is below 40 mg/dL, a person is at four times the risk.

The good news is that a study at Duke University Medical Center has produced some surprising and encouraging results.

Triglycerides: How Aerobic Exercise Helps

Moderate aerobic exercise like walking a half hour at least five days a week can signicantly reduce the triglyceride levels in the blood as well as boost your HDL (good cholesterol). Burning 200 calories or so on that half hour walk doesn’t hurt either.

The study also showed that more intense exercise did help with belly fat but produced only half the triglyceride lowering results.

So my recommendation is: consult your doctor, find your triglycerides level and get clearance to exercise.

If it is elevated and belly fat is not an issue do moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or cardio dance. If you also have extra belly fat, consider adding strength training exercise every other day to raise your metabolism and help your body burn more fat.

Don’t over do it. Ease-in. Start with a few minutes a day of something fun. Pleasure is the key to sustainability.

Couple this with a low fat diet and moderate alcohol consumption and you’ve got a recipe for better quality of life and maybe even a longer one.

For more info visit www.mirabaiholland.com

 

 

Share